If you’re using Panasonic, Olympus or OM System cameras, you need the best Micro Four Thirds lenses. These are the finest we’ve tested.


In our guide to the best Micro Four Thirds lenses, we’re counting off all the best glass for Panasonic, Olympus and OM System cameras. For a lens to be included here, it has to have been reviewed by our technical team – and have impressed then. Therefore, while there are a lot of MFT lenses out there, only the really standout ones have made it onto this list.

We’ve divided the guide up into sections. First, we’ve included the Micro Four Thirds lenses that scored a full five stars from our team, which translates to a Gold Award. Next, we’ve added the ones that received 4.5 stars. After that, the 4-star lenses, and finally, a couple of lenses that have been tested in our field tests, and didn’t receive a star rating, but impressed the team.

Micro Four Thirds is a versatile and rewarding system, and is also less confusing than it may appear from the outside. The key thing to remember is the interchangeable nature of the system – Panasonic G lenses can be used on Olympus and OM System cameras, and vice versa. This means you can quite creative when building up your lens collection, and don’t have to limit yourself to a single brand name. See our guides to the best Panasonic cameras and best Olympus cameras to see more of what the system has to offer.

If you’re not sure how to go about choosing an MFT lens, here first are a few pointers.

How to choose the Best Micro Four Thirds lens:

Image Stabilisation – IS, Power OIS, Mega OIS – If you’re using a Micro Four Thirds camera without In-Body Image Stabilisation (IBIS), then having optical image stabilisation in the lens is going to be of particular interest, it’s also worth looking out for it when looking at longer telephoto lenses. Panasonic lenses with optical image stabilisation come with “Power” or “Mega” OIS, whilst Olympus lenses with optical image stabilisation simply have “IS” in the name.

Manual Focus or Autofocus – The majority of Micro Four Thirds lenses are autofocus, but some, from companies like Laowa, and Samyang, are manual focus only. If manual focus isn’t for you, then make sure to check first.

Crop factor – The Micro Four Thirds system has a 2x crop factor, so that means that a 50mm lens used on a Micro Four Thirds camera, will actually give a 2x cropped view, giving the equivalent to a 100mm lens (in 35mm equivalent terms).

Weather-sealing – If you’re likely to be shooting street or landscape photography and don’t want to stop due to poor weather conditions, then look out for a lens that is weather-sealed, as this will help protect your lens, as well as your camera.

So without further delay, here are the Best Micro Four Thirds Lenses, starting with the best of the best:

5 Star rated lenses: (Gold award)

Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 8-25mm f/4 PRO

Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 8-25mm F4 Pro review image

The Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 8-25mm F4 Pro mid-review. Photo credit: Andy Westlake

At a glance:

  • Filter thread: 72mm
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.23m
  • Weight: 411g
  • Price: £899 / $1099

The Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 8-25mm f/4 PRO lens gives you a great wide-angle range, from ultra-wide 16mm to 50mm equivalent. It offers superb optical quality, as well as impressive close-up performance. With it being a PRO model, you’ll find that it’s also got excellent build quality and handling.

In our review, we were blown away by the sharpness of this lens, as well as its unique versatility. The crop factor means it’s not so much a super-wide zoom as it is a standard lens that can also zoom out to a super-wide perspective. Having that 50mm at the long end gives you a good everyday focal length to work with, and you’ve also got exceptional close-up capabilities at your disposal.

Pros

  • Great quality throughout zoom range
  • Snappy, silent autofocus
  • Generally excellent build quality

Cons

  • On the heavy side for MFT

Best for: All round use, including wide-angle

Read the Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 8-25mm f/4 PRO review


Leica DG Nocticron 42.5mm f/1.2 ASPH Power OIS

Panasonic Leica DG Nocticron 42.5mm f/1.2 Asph Power OIS

Panasonic Leica DG Nocticron 42.5mm f/1.2 Asph Power OIS

At a glance:

  • Filter thread: 67mm
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.5m
  • Weight: 425g
  • Price: £1149 / $1397

The Leica DG Nocticron 42.5mm f/1.2 ASPH Power OIS lens gives you an impressive short telephoto portrait lens, with autofocus, optical image stabilisation, and impressive image quality, this is a high quality lens with a lot to love. However, it does come at a price, being roughly £1149 new, or around £730 used.

When we reviewed the Leica DG Nocticron 42.5mm f/1.2 ASPH Power OIS lens, we found ourselves wowed by that big f/1.2 aperture and its unerring ability to pluck key subjects from their backgrounds. It may not be the technically sharpest lens at f/1.2, but you don’t buy an f/1.2 lens for sharpness. You buy it for creative expression, and the Leica DG Nocticron 42.5mm f/1.2 ASPH Power OIS lens delivers that in spades.

Pros

  • Razor-thin depth of field
  • Fast focusing

Cons

  • Not the sharpest lens in the box

Best for: portraits and bokeh

Read the Leica DG Nocticron 42.5mm f/1.2 ASPH Power OIS review


Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 25mm F1.2 PRO

Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 25mm F1.2 PRO

Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 25mm F1.2 PRO

At a glance:

  • Filter thread: 62mm
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.3m
  • Weight: 410g
  • Price: £863 / $1299

The Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 25mm F1.2 PRO lens gives a fast F1.2 aperture, a manual focus ring, and beautiful bokeh, but it comes at a price, at roughly £1000. For those that want the extra brightness, and low-light abilities, this lens is well worth looking at, but for many, the price will be a concern.

As we said in our review, this is not a lens for everyone. The Panasonic Leica 25mm F1.4 may well represent better value for money, delivering a similar shooting experience for about half the price, not to mention half the weight. However, the Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 25mm F1.2 PRO lens is a pretty special optic, with character and uniqueness to spare, especially in the quality of bokeh. There’s a reason we gave it five stars.

Pros

  • Fast maximum aperture
  • Gorgeous bokeh
  • Weather sealing

Cons

  • Quite hefty
  • Pricier than alternatives

Best for: portraits and bokeh, with a 50mm equivalent view

Read our Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 25mm F1.2 PRO review


Samyang 21mm f/1.4 ED AS UMC CS

Samyang 21mm f/1.4 ED AS UMC CS

Samyang 21mm f/1.4 ED AS UMC CS

At a glance:

  • Filter thread: 58mm
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.28m
  • Weight: 275g
  • Price: £279

This is a manual focus lens available for a range of APS-C and Micro Four Thirds lens mounts, it’s also been released as a CINE T1.5 version of the lens for use with video creation. The lens gives direct aperture control, and manual focus. You may struggle to find this lens, so keep an eye out for the CINE version, or have a look to see if it’s available used.

It’s certainly not a lens for everyone. Being restricted to manual focus only is naturally going to affect what kinds of images you can and can’t capture. However, if you are someone who’s often using a tripod, is generally capturing subjects that don’t move too quickly, or are just generally taking a lot of care over the finer points of focus before tripping the shutter, you may find that the Samyang 21mm f/1.4 ED AS UMC CS suits you down to the ground.

Pros

  • Affordable
  • Images look good throughout aperture range

Cons

  • Spotty availability
  • Manual focus only

Best for: manual controls, and manual focus

Read the Samyang 21mm f/1.4 ED AS UMC CS review


Samyang 50mm f/1.2 UMC CS

Samyang 50mm f/1.2 UMC CS

Samyang 50mm f/1.2 UMC CS

At a glance:

  • Filter thread: 62mm
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.5m
  • Weight: 385g
  • Price: £373

The Samyang 50mm f/1.2 UMC CS lens is a manual focus lens, that is available in a number of different lens mounts, including Micro Four Thirds. The lens offers a large f/1.2 aperture, making it one of the “brightest” lenses available in this list, but it’s also excellent value for money, being available for around £300. If manual focus isn’t for you, then have a look at the Leica 42.5mm f/1.2 lens above. You’ll find it’s also available as a CINE version, with T1.3 aperture, and gearing designed for video creation.

This lens arrived at our review desk at a similar time to the 21mm f/1.4 ED AS UMC CS, and we were sceptical as to whether it could deliver the same kind of ultra-impressive image quality. We needn’t have feared – the Samyang 50mm f/1.2 UMC CS is absolutely sublime, producing stunning results at its shallowest depth of field with that f/1.2 aperture. For MFT portrait shooters, it’s an ideal choice, as long as you don’t mind putting in the work of manually focusing.

Pros

  • Great sharpness at wide apertures
  • Very good value

Cons

  • No autofocus

Best for: manual controls, with bright f1.2 aperture

Read the Samyang 50mm f/1.2 UMC CS review


Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-45mm f/4 PRO

Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-45mm f/4 PRO

The Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-45mm f/4 PRO on test. Photo credit: Andy Westlake

At a glance:

  • Filter thread: 58mm
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.12m
  • Weight: 254g
  • Price: £599 / $699

The Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-45mm f/4 PRO lens is designed to be a compact, but high-quality zoom lens, giving a useful 24-90mm equivalent. It weighs in at just 254g, making this very light, and at 7cm long, it’s also compact. It’s smaller than the 12-40mm f/2.8 lens, whilst also offering slightly more telephoto reach. As a PRO lens it is weather-sealed, making it suitable for shooting in poor weather conditions. Image quality is excellent, and the lens also offers excellent close-up performance.

Pros

  • Weather sealed build
  • Excellent for close-ups
  • Lightweight and portable

Cons

  • Susceptible to flare

Best for: all-in-one wide-zoom, with weather-sealing

Read the Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-45mm f/4 PRO review


Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-100mm f/4 IS Pro

Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-100mm f/4 IS PRO

The Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-100mm f/4 IS PRO boasts stand-out stabilisation. Photo credit: Andy Westlake

At a glance:

  • Filter thread: 72mm
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.015m
  • Weight: 561g
  • Price: £1199 / $1399

The Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-100mm f/4 IS PRO lens offers an impressive zoom range, equivalent to 24-200mm, giving a versatile all-in-one zoom lens. It’s also been designed to give high image quality, and offer the user extra shooting versatility thanks to its sophisticated stabilisation system.

Superzooms can often disappoint when it comes to image quality, but the Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-100mm f/4 IS Pro really is quite a wonder, scoring the full five stars in our review. The ‘PRO’ designation in the name means the lens has been constructed with nothing less than premium optical elements. It’s equally high-quality on the outside too, with a weather-sealed construction that’s perfect for outdoor photography.

Pros

  • High quality throughout zoom range
  • Excellent stabilisation system

Cons

  • f/4 max aperture

Best for: all-in-one super zoom

Read our Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-100mm f/4 IS PRO review


4.5 star rated lenses:

Panasonic Leica DG Summilux 9mm f/1.7 ASPH

Panasonic Leica DG Summilux 9mm f/1.7 ASPH

Panasonic Leica DG Summilux 9mm f/1.7 ASPH. Photo credit: Amy Davies

At a glance:

  • Filter thread: 55mm
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.095m
  • Weight: 130g
  • Price: £449 / $497

This wide-angle prime, a recent effort from Panasonic, is a solid addition to the kit bag of any landscape photographer using Micro Four Thirds. It impressed across the board in our testing, delivering sharp results in the majority of the shooting scenarios we subjected it to. It’s also worth noting that this is an autofocus lens, which somewhat sets it apart in the MFT system – generally if you want something this wide (18mm equivalent), your options are manual focus only.

It’s good to see Panasonic continuing to focus on Micro Four Thirds, even with its Lumix S full-frame series continuing to hog the limelight. The Panasonic Leica DG Summilux 9mm f/1.7 ASPH. is a unique lens that plugs a genuine gap in the MFT system, and its excellent across-the-board sharpness is a winner. Distortion is kept to a minimum, and it’s only once you stop down to around f/16 that you start to see pronounced softness – and for a lens this light and this well-priced, something had to give. This is an ideal walk-around lens for the Micro Four Thirds user.

Pros

  • Near-unique in MFT system
  • Very small and light
  • AF is quiet and fast

Cons

  • No aperture ring

Best for: Landscapes and ultra-wide street shooting

Read our Panasonic Leica DG Summilux 9mm f/1.7 ASPH review


OM-System M.Zuiko Digital ED 20mm f/1.4 PRO

OM-System M.Zuiko Digital ED 20mm f/1.4 PRO

The OM-System M.Zuiko Digital ED 20mm f/1.4 PRO heralds a new chapter in the Olympus imaging story. Photo credit: Andy Westlake

At a glance:

  • Filter thread: 58mm
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.25m
  • Weight: 247g
  • Price: £649 / $799

The first lens from OM Digital Solutions, the OM-System M.Zuiko Digital ED 20mm f/1.4 PRO lens lives up to the PRO name and like other Olympus M.Zuiko lenses, delivers excellent optical performance. Andy Westlake reviews the lens, and finds that it gives a great balance between size and weight, whilst offering a bright f/1.4 aperture. It’s also a more affordable option when compared to the f/1.2 lenses available.

We’d been wanting to see a lens like this for Micro Four Thirds for some time – something fast but light, not weighed down by the kind of optical construction required for f/1.2. The OM-System M.Zuiko Digital ED 20mm f/1.4 PRO is a delight of a lens, a fast standard prime at the underrated 40mm equivalent focal length.

Pros

  • Portable for an f/1,4 lens
  • Smooth, attractive out-of-focus blur
  • Quick, quiet autofocus

Cons

  • No focus clutch mechanism

Best for: high-image quality, and 40mm view

Read our OM System M.Zuiko Digital ED 20mm f/1.4 PRO Review


Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 7-14mm f/2.8 PRO

Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 7-14mm f/2.8 PRO Lens

Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 7-14mm f/2.8 PRO Lens

At a glance:

  • Filter thread: n/a
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.2m
  • Weight: 534g
  • Price: £1059 / $1399

The Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 7-14mm f/2.8 PRO is a lens that gives an ultra-wide angle zoom range of 14-28mm (in 35mm equivalent terms), and with a fixed f/2.8 aperture available the lens can give better low light performance than other ultra-wide-angle zooms available for Micro Four Thirds. If you’re in the market for an ultra-wide zoom, then this is definitely up there with the best.

We tested this lens fully for distortion and aberration, and found its image quality to be generally superb – you can nitpick about the slightly soft corners at the widest focal length and aperture settings if you want. However, this is pretty common in lenses of this type, and here it’s restricted to the very outer edges of the frame. The centre is dead sharp – at f/5.6, it’s pretty well faultless.

Best for: ultra-wide zoom with f2.8 aperture, landscapes

Pros

  • Excellent handling
  • Compact build

Cons

  • Some corner softness at wide angles

Read the Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 7-14mm f/2.8 PRO review


OM System M.Zuiko Digital ED 40-150mm F4.0 PRO

OM System M.Zuiko Digital ED 40-150mm F4.0 PRO lens

OM System M.Zuiko Digital ED 40-150mm F4.0 PRO lens

At a glance:

  • Filter thread: 62mm
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.7m
  • Weight: 382g
  • Price: £799 / $899

Announced alongside the flagship OM-1 camera, the M.Zuiko Digital ED 40-150mm F4.0 PRO is its second all-new optic under the OM System brand, after the M.Zuiko Digital ED 20mm F1.4 PRO. It’s a compact, weather-sealed telephoto zoom than employs a space-saving retractable design and promises premium optics. With a zoom range equivalent to 80-300mm on full-frame, it’s designed for use with Olympus and OM System cameras but can also be used on Panasonic Lumix G-series MFT bodies.

Of course, anyone can make claims about a lens’s image quality – but how does this zoom stack up in the real world? Well, we tested it out and found that sharpness-wise, it’s pretty hard to fault the OM System M.Zuiko Digital ED 40-150mm F4.0 PRO. There’s loads of detail from corner to corner, even at the widest aperture setting. With f/4 you won’t get the kind of clean and attractive background you get from faster lenses, but as long as you’re aware of this limitation, the M.Zuiko Digital ED 40-150mm F4.0 PRO is a cracking lens.

Pros

  • IP53-rated weather-sealing
  • Excellent optical quality
  • Super-fast autofocus

Cons

  • Lacking some physical controls
  • Background blur can be messy

Best for: Telephoto zoom, in a compact lens

Read the OM System M.Zuiko Digital ED 40-150mm F4.0 PRO review


Sigma 56mm f/1.4 DC DN

Sigma 56mm f/1.4 DC DN

Sigma 56mm f/1.4 DC DN is an all-purpose prime that impresses. Photo credit: Michael Topham

At a glance:

  • Filter thread: 55mm
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.5m
  • Weight: 280g
  • Price: £379 / $475

The Sigma 56mm f/1.4 DC DN is part of a range of compact prime lenses designed for APS-C and Micro Four Thirds mirrorless cameras. With a bright f/1.4 aperture, this is a great portrait lens, giving a 112mm equivalent on Micro Four Thirds cameras. It’s also relatively compact, and would make a great choice for anyone needing to shoot in low-light conditions.

In our review, we especially appreciated how the smaller size of this prime lens means it’s doesn’t dwarf or overbalance even the smaller mirrorless cameras. Also, the sheer value for money here is really quite impressive – getting an effective little telephoto prime for an MFT camera at this price really can’t be sniffed at, especially with that aforementioned generous maximum aperture.

Pros

  • Excellent value for money
  • Solid construction
  • Good physical size for MFT

Cons

  • No AF/MF switch

Best for: longer telephoto portraits with pleasing bokeh

Read the Sigma 56mm f/1.4 DC DN review


Panasonic Leica DG Summilux 12mm f/1.4 ASPH.

Panasonic Leica DG Summilux 12mm f/1.4 Asph

Panasonic Leica DG Summilux 12mm f/1.4 Asph

At a glance:

  • Filter thread: 62mm
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.2m
  • Weight: 335g
  • Price: £1049 / $1297

The Leica DG Summilux 12mm f/1.4 ASPH lens is a premium lens with the Leica branding, and the wide-angle lens gives a 24mm equivalent. You’ll find an aperture ring on the lens, but you can also control the aperture with the camera. There’s also a solid build quality, thanks to a metal construction, and you’ll also benefit from weather-sealing. Perhaps more importantly, the lens also delivers excellent image quality, with plenty of fine detail, even when shooting wide-open.

We really rated this as a landscape lens when we came to review it, especially given that robustly weatherproof construction that keeps the rain out. It’s also a solid do-it-all documentary lens, with fast and silent autofocus that can be relied upon to nail the shot in varying conditions. We weren’t huge fan of either the manual focusing ring or the aperture ring, the former being too slippery, the latter being incompatible with Olympus. A bit of a shame, with the high price tag of this lens meaning it’s possibly not worth it for MFT shooters who aren’t using Panasonic.

Pros

  • Great for low light
  • Splashproof construction

Cons

  • Quite expensive
  • Aperture ring won’t work with Olympus

Best for: shooting wide-open landscapes with high image quality

Read the Leica DG Summilux 12mm f/1.4 ASPH review


Panasonic Lumix G 25mm f/1.7 ASPH.

Panasonic Lumix G 25mm f/1.7 ASPH

Panasonic Lumix G 25mm f/1.7 ASPH

At a glance:

  • Filter thread: 46mm
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.25m
  • Weight: 125g
  • Price: £149 / $247

The Panasonic Lumix G 25mm f/1.7 ASPH lens is an entry-level, and very affordable bright prime lens. Since it gives a 50mm equivalent field of view, you can think of this lens as the “Nifty Fifty” to get for your Micro Four Thirds camera. Being roughly half the price of an Olympus 25mm f/1.8 lens, this Panasonic lens is hard to beat.

We were very impressed with the lens in our review – once again, Panasonic shows an ability to listen to its community and produces a genuinely useful and affordable lens. The Lumix G 25mm f/1.7 ASPH handles well, focuses fast and delivers decent sharpness. For the price, it’s an absolute bargain.

Pros

  • Super-affordable
  • Useful standard focal length

Cons

  • Lots of credible alternatives

Best for: great value, portraits, compact lens

Read the Panasonic Lumix G 25mm f/1.7 ASPH review


Laowa MFT 10mm F2.0 C&D Dreamer

Laowa MFT 10mm F2.0 C&D Dreamer

The Laowa MFT 10mm F2.0 C&D Dreamer is a tiny lens indeed. Photo credit: Andy Westlake

At a glance:

  • Filter thread: 46mm
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.12m
  • Weight: 125g
  • Price: £399

Priced at £399, this manual focus Micro Four Thirds lens offers a 20mm equivalent angle of view, and is just 125g in weight. Being only 41mm long, it’s a tiny little lens that will suit those people looking for a compact, portable lens. This lens may be manual focus, but it has electronic contacts, and the aperture is controlled by the camera.

The Laowa MFT 10mm F2.0 C&D Dreamer has been designed to give minimal distortion, and our testing bore this out, with the lens producing very impressive results indeed, especially once stopped down a few clicks. For those looking for a wide-angle lens, this is a great choice, scoring 4.5 stars in our review.

Pros

  • Small, super lightweight
  • Good sharpness at narrow apertures

Cons

  • Vignetting at f/2
  • No autofocus

Best for: wide-angle shooting with manual focus

Read our Laowa MFT 10mm F2.0 C&D Dreamer Review.


4 star rated lenses:

Sigma 30mm f/1.4 DC DN

Sigma 30mm f/1.4 DC DN

The Sigma 30mm f/1.4 DC DN delivers a 60mm equivalent field of view on MFT. Photo credit: Richard Sibley

At a glance:

  • Filter thread: 52mm
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.3m
  • Weight: 265g
  • Price: £269 / $339

The Sigma 30mm f/1.4 DC DN is part of a range of bright f/1.4 lenses designed for APS-C and Micro Four Thirds mirrorless cameras, along with the 56mm f/1.4, there’s also a 16mm f/1.4 lens available. The Sigma 30mm f/1.4 gives a 60mm equivalent field of view, making it slightly longer than the “standard” 50mm lens. With an f/1.4 aperture, it’s also a good choice if you need to shoot in low-light conditions.

Just like Sigma’s other f/1.4 mirrorless primes, this lens delivers great quality for an impressively reasonable price. In our testing, we found that it produced sharp-enough images at f/1.4, and sharpness just got better and better as we stopped down. In fact, we recommended that Micro Four Thirds users especially should strongly consider adding it to their kit bags, as the smaller sensor means you’ll see much less vignetting than the APS-C crowd.

Pros

  • Edge-to-edge sharpness
  • Useful optical coatings
  • Performs great wide-open

Cons

  • Focus is quiet, not silent

Best for: low-light and portraits

Read the Sigma 30mm f/1.4 DC DN review


Laowa 7.5mm f/2 MFT

Laowa 7.5mm f/2 MFT

The Laowa 7.5mm f/2 MFT looks the part with retro-styled Olympus cameras. Photo credit: Andy Westlake

At a glance:

  • Filter thread: 46mm
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.12m
  • Weight: 170g
  • Price: £529 / $549

The Laowa 7.5mm f/2 MFT is a manual focus lens with direct aperture control, with no electrical contact to the camera. The lens is available in silver or black, and gives an ultra-wide 15mm equivalent. Being made for Micro Four Thirds only, it’s extremely compact, and lightweight making it easy to take with you wherever you go.

Aesthetically, this lens pairs like a dream with retro-styled Olympus and OM System cameras. This may or may not matter to you, but one thing that every photographer should take note of is the top-notch sharpness, particularly in the centre. For a tactile, throwback shooting experience, with aperture and focus controlled by rings on the barrel, this lens is a dream. We had a great time shooting with it.

Pros

  • Excellent centre sharpness
  • Small, lightweight

Cons

  • No autofocus
  • Not weatherproof

Best for: ultra-wide view and manual focus

Read the Laowa 7.5mm f/2 MFT review


Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 8mm f/1.8 Fisheye PRO – £699 / $1002

Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 8mm f/1.8 Fisheye PRO

The Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 8mm f/1.8 Fisheye PRO is long for a fisheye lens.

At a glance:

  • Filter thread: n/a
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.12m
  • Weight: 315g
  • Price:

If you’re looking for a fisheye lens, then the Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 8mm f/1.8 PRO is a fisheye lens with autofocus (AF), and weather sealing. It’s got a fast maximum aperture, making it suitable for low-light use, and delivers impressive image quality. We found in our review that we got consistently excellent results. We got best results from processing out some lateral chromatic aberration, though this is to be expected from wide-angle lenses of this type. It also served to remove unsightly colour fringing, and improve apparent edge sharpness.

This is a bit of a niche lens – do many shooters need a weather-sealed fisheye – but if you happen to fall into that niche, you’re in for a treat.

Pros

  • Robust and splashproof
  • Fast, silent autofocus
  • Generally good optical quality

Cons

  • Expensive for a fisheye
  • On the bulky side

Best for: fisheye, creative landscapes / architecture

Read the Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 8mm f/1.8 Fisheye PRO review


Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 100-400mm f/5-6.3 IS

Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 100-400mm f/5-6.3 IS

Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 100-400mm f/5-6.3 IS mid-test. Photo credit: Andy Westlake

At a glance:

  • Filter thread: 72mm
  • Minimum focus distance: 1.3m
  • Weight: 1120g
  • Price: £1299 / $1499

The Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 100-400mm f/5-6.3 IS lens is a mid-range telephoto zoom that gives a 200-800mm equivalent, although with a relatively slow aperture, you do need bright sunny conditions to get the best out of the lens and camera. It’s also compatible with the Olympus MC-14 and MC-20 teleconverters if you want even more reach.

We were ultimately a little hesitant on this lens in our review. It’s undoubtedly good, the way pretty much all lenses from the major manufacturers can be described as “good”. However, it’s oddly heavy for an Olympus lens, and the two-thirds stop aperture disadvantage at 100mm can really get in the way when light levels start to drop. Still, it’s a lens that can produce gorgeous results in the right conditions.

Pros

  • Excellent sharpness
  • Close focusing distance
  • Robust and weather-sealed

Cons

  • Somewhat bulky
  • f/5-6.3 is restricting

Best for: impressive telephoto reach

Read the Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 100-400mm f/5-6.3 IS review


Panasonic Lumix G Vario 12-60mm f/3.5-5.6 ASPH Power OIS

Panasonic Lumix G Vario 12-60mm f/3.5-5.6 ASPH Power OIS

Panasonic Lumix G Vario 12-60mm f/3.5-5.6 ASPH Power OIS

At a glance:

  • Filter thread: 58mm
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.25m
  • Weight: 210g
  • Price: £349 / $497

The 12-60mm lens gives a useful zoom range from 24-120mm equivalent, with optical image stabilisation, and a more affordable price tag compared to some lenses. Focus is snappy, and image quality is respectable, making is a great upgrade option for those who have a 14-42mm kit lens.

After having spent some time with the lens for our review, we felt it could be a tempting option for Olympus / OM System users as well as Panasonic. In practice, MFT users tend to stick in their lane more than the marketing material likes to make out, but the weather-sealed build and fast aperture of this lens make it a great pairing with cameras from the other side of the system.

Pros

  • Very portable
  • Silent autofocus and aperture mechanisms
  • 25cm close focusing distance

Cons

  • Image quality more good than great

Best for: all-in-one zoom with good value for money

Read the Panasonic Lumix G Vario 12-60mm f/3.5-5.6 ASPH Power OIS review


Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-200mm f/3.5-6.3

Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-200mm f/3.5-6.3

Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-200mm f/3.5-6.3 tested by AP’s review team. Photo credit: Andy Westlake

At a glance:

  • Filter thread: 72mm
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.22m
  • Weight: 455g
  • Price: £799 / $899

The Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-200mm f/3.5-6.3 all-in-one “super zoom” lens offers a somewhat incredible 24-400mm equivalent zoom range. The lens benefits from a weather-resistant construction, but due to the lack of optical image stabilisation, it’s not recommended for use on cameras that don’t feature in-body image stabilisation (IBIS), as it could be tricky to get sharp shots when using more of the telephoto zoom.

As we noted in our review, it’s also not as sharp as other lenses, particularly at the telephoto end of the lens, however, this is often the case with super zoom lenses. We found it highly enjoyable to use, even if it did struggle noticeably in low light.

Pros

  • Huge zoom range
  • Weather-resistant
  • Good close-focusing distance

Cons

  • Middling sharpness
  • Autofocus struggles in low light

Best for: all-in-one super zoom with plenty of reach

Read the Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-200mm f/3.5-6.3 review


Tamron 14-150mm f/3.5-5.8 Di III

Tamron 14-150mm f/3.5-5.8 Di III

Tamron 14-150mm f/3.5-5.8 Di III

At a glance:

  • Filter thread: 52mm
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.5m
  • Weight: 285g
  • Price: £390

The Tamron 14-150mm f/3.5-5.8 Di III offers an alternative to the Olympus 14-150mm f/4.0-5.6 II, and Panasonic 14-140mm f/3.5-5.6 II super zoom lenses, with slightly more telephoto reach than the Panasonic, and being slightly brighter at the wide-angle end than the Olympus. The lens lacks optical image stabilisation, so it is best paired with a camera body that features in-body image stabilisation.

As we said in our review, this lack of stabilisation does limit its usefulness with the Panasonic side of Micro Four Thirds. Still, with its pricing undercutting the Olympus, Panasonic  and OM System equivalents so thoroughly, it’s difficult to think of reason why an MFT shouldn’t at least consider this lens.

Pros

  • Cheaper than rivals
  • Great size for travel

Cons

  • No weatherproofing
  • No stabilisation

Best for: all-in-one super zoom

Read the Tamron 14-150mm f/3.5-5.8 Di III review


More Micro Four Thirds lens to consider:

Whilst we haven’t rated these lenses, we have given them a thorough test, and you can find out what we think of them, as well as view sample photos from these lenses to see if they’re what you’re looking for.

Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 150-400mm f/4.5 TC1.25x IS PRO

Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 150-400mm

Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 150-400mm

At a glance:

  • Filter thread: 95mm
  • Minimum focus distance: 1.3m
  • Weight: 1,875g
  • Price: £6499 / $7499

For the professional sports or wildlife photographer, this lens offers a 300-800mm equivalent range, which can be extended to 375-1000mm (at f/5.6) using the built-in 1.25x teleconverter! When used with the Olympus OM-D E-M1X it’s also said to be able to give up to 8 stops of image stabilisation! It’s also considerably lighter than full-frame equivalents. It’s also compatible with the Olympus MC-14 and MC-20 teleconverters if you want even more reach.

We put this lens in the hands of professional photographer Andrew Fusek Peters for a full field test, and he came away very impressed indeed. Sharpness remained consistently good throughout the zoom range, and when light levels were just so, the images the lens produced were nothing short of sublime.

Pros

  • Useful built-in 1.2x converter
  • Versatile zoom range
  • Weather sealed

Cons

  • Very pricey
  • Bird AF slower than rivals

Best for: professional quality telephoto zoom with maximum reach

Read the Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 150-400mm f/4.5 TC 1.25x IS PRO review


Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 40-150mm f/2.8 PRO

Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 40-150mm f/2.8 PRO

Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 40-150mm f/2.8 PRO

At a glance:

  • Filter thread: 72mm
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.7m
  • Weight: 760g
  • Price: £1299 / $1499

The Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 40-150mm f/2.8 PRO lens is the go-to lens for those who want high-quality images, and a bright f/2.8 aperture throughout the zoom range. It’s well matched to the Olympus 12-40mm f/2.8 PRO lens, as the zoom range follows on from this, giving an 80-300mm equivalent zoom range. It’s also weather-sealed, and has an internal zoom mechanism so that the lens doesn’t change length when you zoom.

With a metal build and well-engineered handling, this is a pleasant lens to use. Time marches on, and with the OM System version out there for a cheaper asking price, there may not be much call for this zoom – but it’s an excellent optic in its own right.

Pros

  • Broad, useful zoom range
  • Smooth, satisfying handling
  • Good detail resolving

Cons

  • Built-in hood can interfere with zoom ring

Best for: telephoto zoom with bright aperture, ideal for sports

Read the Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 40-150mm f/2.8 PRO preview


More reading

If you’re looking for more zoom lens options, then have a look at our round-up of the Best Zoom Lenses for Micro Four Thirds, or have a look at our latest lens reviews.


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